Why Translation Matters – Review

**Before beginning my review, I want to take a moment and thank my fellow blogger Silvia Cachia for the recommendation. You can read her blog by clicking this hyperlink**

Why Translation Matters by Edith Grossman

Published in 2010

Pages: 160

Genre: Nonfiction, academic, language

“The vast, constantly expanding sea of contemporary literature can easily swamp any reader interested in keeping abreast of new works and new writers.”

Why Translation Matters, by Edith Grossman, is less of a book and more of an extended argument in defense of the practice and necessity of translating literature. Comprised of three essays and an introduction that gives context as to who Grossman is, Why Translation Matters is part of a series, created by Yale University, that asks experts to explain the intricacies and necessities of their fields. Debunking misconceptions and demonstrating the difficulty of her profession, Grossman creates a compelling thesis that will convince her reader to view translated pieces from a far more enlightened perspective. Continue reading “Why Translation Matters – Review”

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The Lowland – Review

 The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

Published in 2013

Pages: 415

Genre: Contemporary fiction

“East of the Tolly Club, after Deshapran Sashmal Road splits in two, there is a small mosque.”

The Lowland, by Jhumpa Lahiri, weaves through years and across oceans to create a narrative that is universal despite the specificity of the culture from which the characters originate. There is a kaleidoscopic element to the human experience that is captured and translated into the words within this novel. Pay attention; you might miss something. Continue reading “The Lowland – Review”

Equal Rites – Review

Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1987

Pages: 264

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“This is a story about magic and where it goes and perhaps more importantly where it comes from and why, although it doesn’t pretend to answer all or any of these questions.”

Focusing on a different protagonist than the previous two books in the series, Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett continues his exploration into the magical world that is shaped like a disc. The first in what are known as the “witches” novels within the series (care to guess why?), Equal Rites introduces fan favorite character Granny Weatherwax and does so with grand fanfare. Prepare for another splendid, if succinct, entry in Pratchett’s most famous body of work. Continue reading “Equal Rites – Review”

In the Woods – Review

In the Woods by Tana French

Published in 2007

Pages: 429

Genre: Mystery, thriller

“Picture a summer stolen whole from some coming-of-age film set in small-town 1950s.”

If you enjoy this idyllic vision of a summer day featuring the laughter of children in the background, Dixie cups filled with Kool-Aid mix lemonade, and the well-earned scrapes and bruises from an afternoon of playing, do not continue reading. In the Woods, written by Tana French, twists this picturesque scenery it into a crime novel that takes the reader on a journey down the dark paths of malleable memory and the little lies we tell ourselves to make it through each day. Continue reading “In the Woods – Review”

Wishful Drinking – Review

Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher

Published in 2008

Pages: 156

Genre: Autobiography, memoir, humor

“So I am fifty-two years old.”

Many people around the world felt waves of sorrow and grief for Carrie Fisher in the wake of her death last December. It is a strange thing to read a memoir by a deceased person in which they make a joke about their eventual death, but it isn’t all doom and gloom in Wishful Drinking. This autobiography gives the reader a glimpse into the unreal world of a member of Hollywood royalty while simultaneously showcasing Fisher’s quick wit. Continue reading “Wishful Drinking – Review”